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All the fallout from the Big Ben and Brees injuries

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Big NFL news seems to come in pairs these days. A few weeks ago, the Texans made two huge trades in the matter of an afternoon. Over the past few days, a pair of promising young cornerbacks in Minkah Fitzpatrick and Jalen Ramsey hit the trade market. On Monday, unfortunately, we saw two superstar quarterbacks hit the shelf. After Drew Brees and Ben Roethlisberger left their respective games with injuries in Week 2, it was confirmed that both will undergo surgery.

Brees could miss six weeks after he gets surgery on the thumb of his throwing hand, while Roethlisberger is done for the season after injuring his elbow. Surprises haven’t been hard to come by during this wild league year, but this qualifies as a stunning one-two punch. In going back through the AFL-NFL merger in 1970, I can find exactly one other date in which a pair of future Hall of Fame quarterbacks suffered multi-week injuries on the same date. John Elway and Warren Moon each suffered injuries on Nov. 15, 1992, with Elway missing five weeks and Moon’s absence costing him six.

There are major ramifications for both the Steelers and the Saints, though the injuries hit their teams in different ways. Teams such as the Bills, Browns, Chargers and Colts have a better chance of making the postseason than they would if the Steelers were projecting to roll out Roethlisberger for 14 more starts. And while the NFC South remains wide-open, the Saints might still be the favorites with Teddy Bridgewater under center.

There’s a lot to write about with each of these situations. Let’s start with Roethlisberger, whose season is over after just six quarters of football:


Is this the end for Big Ben?

Ben Roethlisberger‘s injury throws the Steelers into significant uncertainty at the most important position in sports for the first time in 15 years. He has struggled to stay healthy at times — and his off-field behavior has included a serious motorcycle accident and multiple allegations of sexual misconduct — but the Steelers have been assured of generally above-average play from the quarterback they selected in the first round of the 2004 draft. One NFL executive to whom I recently spoke compared his team to a house and the starting quarterback to a roof. The Steelers haven’t had to worry about getting wet for 15 years. Now, suddenly, there’s a huge hole in their roof.

This injury comes at a time when the Steelers already were in transition on offense. Longtime starters Le’Veon Bell, Antonio Brown, Marcus Gilbert and Jesse James — along with legendary offensive line coach Mike Munchak — all left the organization this offseason. While the Steelers already had developed a pair of replacements in running back James Conner and offensive tackle Matt Feiler, Pittsburgh generally used mid-round draft picks (and former Munchak assistant Shaun Sarrett) to replace the others.

Pittsburgh always has been an organization built around drafting and developing young talent; but in recent years, it has used some of its cap space to target veteran help in free agency, including cornerbacks Joe Haden and Steven Nelson. Perhaps owing to the $21.2 million in dead money Brown occupies on their 2019 cap, the only veteran the Steelers added to their offense this year was wideout Donte Moncrief, who has been a disaster while playing through a dislocated finger over the first two weeks of the season.

Roethlisberger was supposed to be the rock of the offense, one of the few players who wasn’t moving into a larger role or subject to a coaching change over the offseason. Now, he’s gone. The Steelers didn’t choose to sign a veteran to help back up Roethlisberger this offseason, instead letting 2017 fourth-rounder Joshua Dobbs and 2018 third-rounder Mason Rudolph compete for the job. Rudolph was the favorite and won the competition, with the Steelers promptly shipping off Dobbs to the Jaguars for a fifth-round pick.

The Steelers already have promoted Devlin Hodges from their practice squad to serve as the new backup quarterback. There aren’t exactly many options available in free agency, but I wonder if Pittsburgh might call Matt Cassel, who played under former Steelers offensive coordinator Todd Haley in Kansas City. Offensive coordinator Randy Fichtner’s scheme shares many of the same playcalls with Haley’s playbook.

Even if the Steelers sign a veteran such as Cassel, they’ll move forward in the short term with Rudolph as the starter. Projecting how he will perform is a difficult enterprise. The 24-year-old played in a spread offense at Oklahoma State under Mike Gundy, posting a 79.1 Total QBR over his four seasons at school. That number comes in just behind Sam Darnold‘s 79.5 mark over his two years at Southern California.

Like Roethlisberger, the 6-foot-5, 230-pound Rudolph has the prototypical size you would expect from an NFL quarterback. Some reports coming out of college, however, suggested Rudolph doesn’t have the prototypical arm strength that often is associated with that physical archetype. For what it’s worth, Rudolph’s numbers throwing deep in college were quite good, as he posted a 98.8 QBR on throws traveling 16 or more yards in the air.

The arm strength concern popped up during Rudolph’s biggest play on Sunday, the 45-yard flea-flicker that he tossed to JuJu Smith-Schuster. When Rudolph threw the pass, Smith-Schuster was accelerating past a wrong-footed Lano Hill, but Rudolph’s throw forced the star wideout to slow down and nearly gave Hill a chance to break it up. A better throw would have produced a walk-in touchdown:

It would be impossible to draw broader conclusions about Rudolph’s future from his appearance on Sunday. He was 12-of-19 passing for 112 yards with two touchdowns and an interception against a Seahawks pass defense that had been gashed by Cincinnati at home the prior week. His interception was entirely on Moncrief, who was benched after his most recent drop. His two touchdown passes were short throws to Vance McDonald, one of which came on a failed screen. The second of those touchdown drives was just three yards. Rudolph didn’t cost the Steelers the game; Pittsburgh’s defense allowing three consecutive touchdown drives in the second half before letting the Seahawks turn a third-and-16 over two plays into a new set of downs was what pushed the Steelers to 0-2.

What we know, historically, is that the success rate for third-round quarterbacks in the NFL hasn’t been great. Since 1990, 36 quarterbacks have been drafted in the third round. Two of them are Rudolph and Will Grier, whose futures still are basically indecipherable. When you look at the other 34, just six became players who started three seasons or more. (This assumes that recently drafted quarterbacks who have been slotted into backup roles, such as C.J. Beathard and Sean Mannion, don’t suddenly turn into multiyear starters.) Five made it to at least one Pro Bowl. Two of them started and won Super Bowls; one was Nick Foles, while the other was the only passer from the 34 to turn into a no-doubt franchise quarterback — Russell Wilson.

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Tim Hasselbeck says that Mason Rudolph’s campaign to become the Steelers’ starting quarterback, even after Ben Roethlisberger’s return, has now begun.

Wilson only fell to the third round because he lacked prototypical size. Rudolph has that size; if NFL organizations thought he had the skills to play quarterback at a high level, he would have been a first-round pick. My working theory with quarterbacks is that the league is generally awful at evaluating passers and that success depends much more on the infrastructure surrounding a quarterback than we think. Moncrief aside, Rudolph seems to have above-average infrastructure around him as he begins his starting career. Most rookie quarterbacks would kill for this offensive line and a receiver as good as Smith-Schuster.

What happens next is up in the air. Roethlisberger, who has flirted with retirement in years past, issued a public statement suggesting he intends to rehab his injury and return to the team in 2020. Plans change, of course; nobody expected quarterbacks such as Peyton Manning (Colts) and Tony Romo (Cowboys) to leave their franchise when they went down injured before a season began, but their departures seemed inevitable by the time those seasons were over.

The best thing for the Steelers, naturally, would be for Rudolph to play like a superstar. If that happens, Pittsburgh will face a difficult decision. Roethlisberger is due a $12.5 million roster bonus on March 20, and his $8.5 million base salary for 2020 already is guaranteed for injury. The Steelers could choose to bring back Big Ben as their starter and keep their quarterback of the future as a backup, but once teams find their new quarterback, they tend to stick with that guy.

Realistically, if Rudolph plays well, the Steelers will have to decide on Roethlisberger’s future on March 20. If they found a trade partner, they would be off the hook for paying him that $21 million in 2020. But if they trade him — or if he retires — they also would simultaneously owe $25 million in dead money on their 2020 cap, which would see the team set the single-season dead money record for a player for the second consecutive season.

If the Steelers chose to designate Roethlisberger as a post-June 1 release, Pittsburgh would owe as much as $33.5 million in dead money, depending on the offset language in his contract. They would be able to spread that money over two years, but it still would be an enormous sum of money for him to go play somewhere else.

What the Minkah Fitzpatrick trade means

Originally, I was going to argue that the Steelers also would be in good shape if Rudolph flamed out. That argument went by the wayside on Monday night, though, when the Steelers sent their 2020 first-round pick to the Dolphins for disgruntled defensive back Minkah Fitzpatrick. The deal leaves Pittsburgh without its first- and third-round selections in the 2020 draft, given that it sent away its third-round pick to move up and grab Devin Bush with the 10th pick in April.

Fitzpatrick was promising as a rookie, and the Steelers will have him under contract for the next three years for a total of less than $6 million, which is a pittance for a starting cornerback in the NFL. It’s reasonable to make the economic case that the surplus value Fitzpatrick plausibly offers as a starter over the next three years would be worth a first-round pick, especially if it falls in the back half of the first round.



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Second straight slow start dooms Chargers in loss to Steelers – Los Angeles Chargers Blog

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CARSON, Calif. — The Los Angeles Chargers laid an egg against the Pittsburgh Steelers in a nationally televised game, falling 24-17 Sunday at Dignity Health Sports Complex in a loss that wasn’t as close as the score indicated.

Amid a sea of black-and-gold-clad Steelers fans and with a full moon hovering over the stadium, Philip Rivers and the Chargers’ offense struggled once again in the opening half, failing to score points for a second straight game.

It’s the first time since 1975 the Chargers have been held scoreless in the first half in back-to-back home games.

And once again the Chargers struggled in the kicking game, with Chase McLaughlin bouncing his 43-yard field goal attempt off the left upright and back into the field of play at the end of the first half.

How bad was it for the Chargers? Quarterback Tyrod Taylor warmed up in the second half, a sign that perhaps head coach Anthony Lynn was ready to pull the trigger and sit Rivers, the Bolts’ longtime starting quarterback.

However, Rivers did appear to have his back evaluated by trainers on the sideline after taking a big hit from Bud Dupree on the opening drive.

Troubling trend: After struggling in the second half of their first three games, the Chargers have dug a hole for themselves with slow starts in the past two. Over those two games, the Chargers have been outscored 38-0 in the first half. Rivers had two turnovers in the first half against the Steelers. They included a dump off to Melvin Gordon on a swing route that was behind him and ruled a backward pass that Steelers rookie linebacker Devin Bush returned 9 yards for a score on the second drive of the game. Bush also corralled a pass tipped by defensive lineman Tyson Alualu at the line of scrimmage for an interception. James Conner turned that into points seven plays later on a 12-yard touchdown run. Rivers has turned it over seven times through six games. Rivers had only 13 turnovers last season.

QB Breakdown: Rivers finished 26-of-44 for 320 passing yards, with two touchdown passes to tight end Hunter Henry, two interceptions and one fumble. Rivers was sacked once, finishing with a 77.8 passer rating. Henry played well in his first game back from a knee injury, totaling eight catches for 100 receiving yards on nine targets. However, Rivers never looked comfortable in the pocket and faced constant pressure most of the night. He also struggled with questionable decision-making for a second straight game. Along with the two turnovers, Rivers also was called for intentional grounding for a second straight game.

Silver lining: At 2-4, the Chargers are only two games behind the AFC West-leading Kansas City Chiefs (4-2), who have also lost two straight. However, the Bolts have back-to-back road games against the Tennessee Titans and Chicago Bears before returning home to host the Green Bay Packers. They could be out of playoff contention by then.

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Jerry Jones — Cowboys’ recent losses not all on Jason Garrett

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EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — As disappointed as Dallas Cowboys owner and general manager Jerry Jones was in his team’s third straight loss, he was not ready to pin sole responsibility on head coach Jason Garrett.

The Cowboys opened the season 3-0 with one of the highest-scoring offenses in the NFL. With their 24-22 loss to the previously winless New York Jets on Sunday, they now find themselves in a bit of a freefall even if they are still tied with the Philadelphia Eagles atop the NFC East.

“I’m going to be very trite. I was a lot happier with what he had done the first three games than what’s happened the last three games,” Jones said. “But the big thing I want to say is it’s not just him. This is across the board. That had a lot of input out there tonight to get in that spot.”

Speaking on 105.3 The Fan in Dallas last week, Jones dispelled the possibility of Garrett getting fired in-season after some oddsmakers made him the second favorite to be fired behind Atlanta’s Dan Quinn.

“Don’t bet any money [on] that happening,” Jones said. “You’ll lose it.”

Jones has made only one in-season coaching move, jettisoning Wade Phillips in favor of Garrett after a 1-7 start to the 2010 season. Garrett took over the job on a full-time basis in 2011 and has made the playoffs three times, but has not advanced past the divisional round.

He is in the final year of his contract, essentially coaching for his future.

“If you really look at it, you can’t take one thing. It can be a list of 15 things with some having more of an emphasis on maybe the player, the execution, mistakes, breaks — all of those kinds of things. Across the board we did not play well enough to win. Had we been able to tie this thing up, or win that thing at the end, it wouldn’t be because we played well. You guys would be writing about a team that did not play well that won a game. Instead you’re [writing] about a team that what usually happens to you when you don’t play well. Am I thinking that this is what we are going to be or what we can do with our 10 games that we have remaining, here we are leading the NFC East? Not at all.

“I want to look at the things that we’re doing right and we’ll give a good look at making the adjustments or whatever the things that haven’t gone good here.”

The Cowboys were 3-3 after six games in 2018 and fell to 3-5 before turning their season around, winning the division and a playoff game.

“Ultimately everything that we want will be determined by what we do from this moment forward,” Garrett said. “We just have to get back to work [Monday], take it one day at a time and try to get better as a football team.”

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Emmanuel Sanders of Denver Broncos leaves game with lingering knee injury

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Broncos wide receiver Emmanuel Sanders did not play in the second half of Denver’s win over the Tennessee Titans because of a knee injury, though all indications, barring something unexpected when he gets treatment with the team’s medical staff Monday morning, were that he might be able to play Thursday night against the Kansas City Chiefs.

Sanders had played throughout the first half of the game and was the target on an incomplete pass from Joe Flacco with only 26 seconds left to play in the first half.

Sanders had one catch for no gain in the half and did not return to the game after halftime.

After Sunday’s game Broncos coach Vic Fangio said: “I don’t know any details yet, all I was told was he hurt his knee a little bit and he wouldn’t be returning [to the game]. That’s all I’ve got.”

Sanders had been limited because of the injury in practice this past week on Wednesday and Friday, but had practiced fully on Thursday.

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