Warning: ini_get_all() has been disabled for security reasons in /home/optimumc/public_html/wsaigosports.com/wp-includes/load.php on line 1040

Warning: ini_get_all() has been disabled for security reasons in /home/optimumc/public_html/wsaigosports.com/wp-includes/load.php on line 1040
World Cup slots pretty much filled – Rohit Sharma – WSAIGO Sports
Connect with us
>

Cricket

World Cup slots pretty much filled – Rohit Sharma

Published

on


India vice-captain Rohit Sharma believes that barring fitness and injury concerns, India’s World Cup squad is most likely to be similar to the one named for the ODI series against Australia and New Zealand. He added, however, that selections would depend on form, and there was thus no guarantee of being picked.

“I think the 13 ODIs we’re going to be playing leading up to the World Cup, you’re going to see more or less the same squad playing in the World Cup,” Rohit said. “Probably one or two changes, keeping in mind the form and injury concerns over the next few months. We’ve played a lot of cricket throughout the year, so injuries are bound to happen. Don’t think there’ll be any drastic change. Looking at the slots – they’re pretty much taken by individuals. Everything will depend on the form of each player, nobody is guaranteed that flight to England.

“It’s slightly early to be talking about the playing XI. But there aren’t going to be any drastic changes We still have 13 games, 4-5 months to go and two months of IPL. Lot of cricket to be played. So it’s hard to name the 11 or 12 that’ll be playing the World Cup.”

India brought back Dinesh Karthik in place of Rishabh Pant, and also excluded Manish Pandey and Umesh Yadav. The ODI squad for the Australia and New Zealand series includes Kedar Jadhav, who has struggled with injuries, and Hardik Pandya, who is back after recovering from the back injury he sustained during the Asia Cup in September.

Frontline quick Jasprit Bumrah has been rested with an eye on his workload, after the four-match Test series where he bowled more overs (157.1) than any other fast bowler.

Rohit feels the absence of Australia’s mainstay fast bowlers – Mitchell Starc, Josh Hazlewood and Pat Cummins – will not make the contest less challenging. Starc and Cummins were not a part of the squad that thumped India 4-1 during the ODI series here in 2016, and Hazlewood played just one game. The damage was largely inflicted by the likes of John Hastings, Kane Richardson and James Faukner.

This time around, along with a number of changes in the batting order, Australia have added veteran quick Peter Siddle, who last played an ODI in 2010, and has had impressive performances in the BBL over the last couple of seasons. Their pace battery also includes Western Australian fast bowlers Jason Behrendorff and Jhye Richardson.

“They don’t play too much of ODI cricket, I think,” Rohit said. “The last time we played in the format here, these guys (Hazlewood, Starc, Cummins) weren’t playing and we were still beaten 4-1. Australia still have quality in their bowling. Of course those three are their premier bowlers but they’ve got guys who can do the job for them.

“They’ve got a bowling line-up who can put us under pressure without a doubt. They’ve been playing some limited-overs cricket, they’ve been doing well. It’s not going to be a walkover situation for us. We’ve still got to grind it out there and make sure we put them under pressure. Team is high on confidence right now so we got to carry it it this format as well.”

While MS Dhoni‘s spot has been among the other middle-order concerns for India, Rohit said the former captain is a “guiding light” and has a larger role to play in the side, also crediting him for the recent successes of India’s wristspinners Yuzvendra Chahal and Kuldeep Yadav.

“Over the years, we’ve seen what sort of presence he [MS Dhoni] has in the dressing room, ” Rohit said. “With him around, there’s a sense of calmness. Him being around the team is always helpful. He’s a guiding light around the group. Also with the bat, batting down the order, providing that finishing touch is very important. He’s finished so many games for us. His role is very important. His presence around the group is a massive factor.

“Someone like Dhoni behind the stumps telling them (Chahal and Kuldeep) what the batsman is trying to do makes a big difference. Since Sri Lanka tour in 2017 they’ve done really well, and one of the reason is MS. He’s guided these two guys in the middle overs, how to keep things tight, field placements. He’s helped the captain a lot in the field as well.”



Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Cricket

‘Careless whispers’ about Maxwell leave Langer fuming

Published

on


Another day, another drama around Australian selection. Head coach Justin Langer was involved in a tense exchange, which he later apologized for, as he said he had “zero knowledge” of guidance given to Glenn Maxwell last year for him to not take up a county deal in England on the assumption that he would be selected for Australia A.

That Australia A place, for a tour of India, never transpired – the justification given was that enough was known about Maxwell’s ability on the subcontinent – and Maxwell was then not selected for the Test tour of the UAE with the instruction of Langer to go and “score more hundreds” to push his credentials. Due to white-ball commitments he has since played just two first-class matches and was not part of Australia’s revamped Test batting line-up to face Sri Lanka.

Speaking on Wednesday, national selector Trevor Hohns said he did not know about any instruction to Maxwell not to spend time in county cricket last year. He added Maxwell was “content” to focus on white-ball cricket ahead of the World Cup, but acknowledged he still had a strong desire to add to his seven Test caps. Maxwell opted against putting his name into the IPL auction this year, instead taking a county stint with Lancashire that will include both first-class and one-day cricket.

The guidance to Maxwell to put rest ahead of county cricket last year – following the one-day tours of England and Zimbabwe – was understood to be made before Langer was appointed the new coach in the wake of the ball-tampering scandal. When pressed on the issue he went back and forth with a journalist before saying he had no knowledge of it.

“Are you certain that’s what happened,” Langer asked of the instructions given to Maxwell, with the journalist responding, “I’m asking”. After two rounds of this, Langer was asked who gave the directive to which he replied: “Did it happen?”

“Well you’re telling me it did happen, I’m asking did it happen?” Langer repeated. “No, I’ve got zero knowledge of that,” he then said, before calling it “careless whispers”.

Before answering the next question, Langer apologised: “Sorry for getting grumpy,” he said. “I don’t like getting grumpy but there’s so many stories that go around about so much stuff. Sorry everyone for getting grumpy. I didn’t mean to get grumpy, but the truth is a beautiful thing.”

Before the exchange about the details of the county deal, Langer had reiterated that Maxwell’s continued omission from the Test side had nothing to do with factors outside of cricket.

“Glenn is crystal clear from me and the selectors, what he needs to do to get back in the Test team,” he said. “He’s shown he is brilliant around the group in white-ball cricket. There’s been some reports about personality. It is literally false. It’s not true. He’s crystal clear what he has to do and that’s important, that he knows that and I know that as the coach and one of the selectors. All the conjecture about it – that’s all part of the noise. Glenn knows exactly what he has to do.”

*Cricket Australia later confirmed Maxwell had in fact been sent a planning email in April discussing his options for the coming year, in which mention was made of resting between the limited-overs tours of England and Zimbabwe and the Australia A tour of India a few weeks later. However a spokesperson denied that the planning email, a common part of discussions between CA and the players, was tantamount to a guarantee of selection.

Selection has been a key debate through the Australian season with the absence of David Warner and Steven Smith leaving a threadbare Test batting order. Marnus Labuschagne was the surprise choice to bat No. 3 in the final Test against India while Matt Renshaw, Joe Burns and Will Pucovski have been called up for the series against Sri Lanka. There have also been considerable changes to the one-day team that will face India.

Maxwell remains part of the one-day set-up but has been asked to take a role lower down the order in recent times, batting at No. 6 in last year’s series against England and South Africa, having been briefly dropped from the team after a lean run in 2017. He has made one half-century in his last 14 ODI innings.

*GMT 0845 The story was amended to include this paragraph.



Source link

Continue Reading

Cricket

Pakistan consider changes after ‘disappointment’ of series defeat

Published

on


It was perhaps no accident Azhar Ali came out to face the press in Johannesburg. With speculation rife about the number of changes Pakistan may make to their side for the third Test – it could be as many as three – Azhar offered a characteristically straight bat to any queries on the subject.

“There might be changes but the captain and the coach should speak about them,” he said. “But there might be changes according to the balance that best suits this pitch.”

With Mickey Arthur having said last week that Shadab Khan‘s recovery from injury gave Pakistan a genuine allrounder who can play at No. 7, those changes can be set in motion. According to the Pakistan coach, No. 8 is the highest he was comfortable playing Faheem Ashraf. Should Shadab and Ashraf slot in, as is widely expected, the struggling Fakhar Zaman and equally hapless Yasir Shah would be likeliest to give way.

ALSO READ: When Babar met Steyn

Given the one-sided nature of the contests so far, it is tempting to write the tour off as yet another miserable episode for Pakistan in South Africa. It took under 18 sessions for the series to be sealed by the hosts, extending Pakistan’s disappointing run in the longer format. Yasir, the man Sarfraz Ahmed had marked out as an important asset to Pakistan even in these conditions, was a non-factor, while the middle order still looks unconvincing. But Azhar, in a somewhat philosophical mood, said just because things hadn’t quite gone to plan didn’t mean the tour was a failure, with several batsmen having “learned a lot”.

“It’s always very tough here. We knew that and we’ve tried to plan for it, but unfortunately things didn’t go to plan. There are some things we think we have achieved on this tour. A few of the batsmen really stuck in and showed we can play on these hard wickets. As a batting unit we did not score enough runs but all the batsmen learned a lot and will hopefully do well in future.”

That he would be pressed on arguably the burning issue of the tour – the state of the pitches – was perhaps inevitable. In three of the four innings so far, Azhar’s stay at the crease has been ended by vicious bouncers, at least one of which reared up from a length. The other dismissal, in the second innings at Cape Town during which he sat on the back foot slightly, more wary of the short ball, saw Azhar undone by one that stayed low from Kagiso Rabada and crashed into his pad plumb in front.

“We knew we’d get pace and bounce but even if you asked the SA batsmen they’d say these wickets were hard. It’s not quite even, there were cracks in both wickets but it’s the same for both teams. We didn’t perform as well as we should have done. We had opportunities but I think the South African attack is very good in these conditions. All the bowlers bowled 140kph-plus apart from Philander but he’s quite accurate, but I do think the pitches were unusually difficult too.”

The good news on that front, though, is Azhar feels the surface at the Wanderers isn’t quite cut from the same cloth. “I think it’s a much better surface than the other two,” he said. “Yes, this does have grass and a few cracks, but I think they will widen a lot later than Centurion and Cape Town.”

The series might be gone in quick time, something Azhar acknowledged the whole team felt “disappointment” about, but wasn’t letting despondency take over. “We are disappointed but every Test match you play in countries like South Africa, England and Australia, it’s always important to bring our A game. We want to do that tomorrow in this Test match. The tour is not over, we still have to play ODIs, so there’s still an opportunity to do well here.”



Source link

Continue Reading

Cricket

Smith to miss two BPL matches to fix elbow injury

Published

on


Steven Smith will miss Comilla Victorians’ next two matches in the BPL, after a previous elbow injury flared up in the last couple of days. He will fly back to Sydney for a check-up but is expected to be back in Bangladesh sometime next week.

“He is quite positive about returning, possibly during the Sylhet phase of the competition,” Victorians media manager Sohanuzzaman Khan told ESPNcricinfo. “He will undergo an MRI in Australia, which isn’t available in Bangladesh, and will inform us about it.”

Their next two matches in Dhaka are against Rajshahi Kings and Chittagong Vikings on January 11 and 13, while their Sylhet phase begins on January 15.

Smith, who led the Victorians to one win in the two outings, has so far made 16 and 0 in his two innings against Sylhet Sixers and Rangpur Riders. The former Australia captain’s participation in the BPL made news after the organisers had to change the drafting rules to accommodate him.

Meanwhile, Khulna Titans have replaced Ali Khan with Junaid Khan after the US fast bowler was ruled out due to a hamstring injury he suffered during his only match in the BPL.



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending