Connect with us
>

Cricket

How friendly can Australia v India actually be?

Published

on


Sunil Gavaskar versus Dennis Lillee. Venkatesh Prasad versus Michael Slater. Andrew Symonds versus Harbhajan Singh. Ricky Ponting versus Zaheer Khan. Gautam Gambhir versus Shane Watson. David Warner versus Rohit Sharma. Virat Kohli versus Steven Smith.

Australia versus India has become synonymous with individual encounters, many of them ugly ones. The Harbhajan v Symonds narrative overshadowed an entire summer, while Kohli’s verbal and mental duels with Smith in 2017 included accusations of systematic cheating by India’s captain. Even the 2014-15 summer, played out in the shadow of Phillip Hughes’ death, contained more histrionics and confrontations than anyone expected.

So what to expect this time around, when Australia are seeking to remake themselves in the wake of the Newlands scandal, while India under Kohli glimpse their best chance, perhaps ever, to win a series in this country? Kohli and Tim Paine‘s teams will exchange handshakes at the outset of the encounter, in a custom the Australian captain has introduced post-Newlands, but the visiting captain was under no illusions that attempts to get under each other’s skin would take place.

“I don’t see stuff happening, which has happened in the past, where both teams have crossed the line but still it’s a competitive sport, it’s international cricket,” Kohli said in Adelaide on Wednesday, the eve of the first Test. “We do not expect guys to just come in and bowl and just walk back. There are going to be times when you have to put the batsmen under pressure, not necessarily crossing the line but just get into their heads, which you expect from any side in the world, not just Australia.

“It is going to be there, but it’s not going to be at the level that has happened in the past where both teams have lost control. But the competitiveness will be there because you eventually want to get guys out if the situation is going your way and you understand you’re up against an important guy in the opposition, you will go hard at that person.

“Be it in your body language or just putting in a word or two. But I don’t see anything radical happening, because the skill-set is high, so we necessarily would not need to get into anything. But at times where the situations are difficult, you do find ways to upset the batsman’s rhythm and I think a bit of banter there is not harmful at all.”

Last week, Paine told ESPNcricinfo that he would not be averse to allowing his players to pick fights should they decide they needed to for reasons of motivation, with the significant change that this should now never lurch into the sort of abuse seen when Warner and Quinton de Kock became embroiled in Durban earlier this year.

“It depends on the individual. I know some guys enjoy it, some guys it doesn’t matter,” Paine said. “In Test cricket and with some of the guys in the Indian side, there’s going to be times where there’s a bit of heat out in the middle, and guys are going to be right into the contest. The focus for us has got to be on delivering our skill as well as we possibly can, so if guys want to get involved in a bit of that stuff to get themselves going, then that’s great.

“But we now know the difference between what’s right and what’s wrong, and what’s expected. We’re not going to be going over the top, but certainly you’ve got to stand up for your team and your teammates, and I’m sure when the time comes for that we’ll be doing that. But the main focus for us will be to play the best cricket we can.”

However on match eve, he offered a simple message about how much things have changed for Australia since Newlands. Where once winning was the only thing, it is now one of two. “We play Test cricket to win, there is no doubt about that,” Paine said. “Clearly we’ve realised we needed to do some work in some areas, of gaining the respect of our country is as high a priority as is winning.”

The way that Australia will play, and the manner in which Paine will lead, will undoubtedly be influenced by home surrounds. As Kohli put it, there is no Australian team yet selected that is vulnerable at home, and that aura will remain evident even if Smith and Warner are absent. “There’s no doubt playing in Australia suits our team,” Paine said. “Having Josh Hazlewood and Pat Cummins back in as well is going to be different and the style of play in Australia compared to the UAE is completely different, but in terms of leadership style it’s going to be exactly the same we are going to go about it the same way we did over there, it’s just going to be tactically slightly different.

“It’s a huge honour, a massive privilege [to captain at home]. I just had an interview with Ricky Ponting and we went through the names of Australian Test captains over the years, so it is a little bit daunting to be in a bracket with some of those guys. At the same time I’m trying to keep it as simple as I can, I’m trying to be myself and do my job which is first and foremost to wicket keep and bat. I’m hugely honoured to be captain of Australia but I am not letting it weigh me down too much.”

For all those aforementioned duels, the distinct impression in Adelaide on series eve was that both Australia and India would prefer that this contest is boiled down to cricket’s most fundamental contest: that between bat and ball.



Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Cricket

Three UAE players suspended for eight weeks from international cricket

Published

on


Three UAE players have been handed an eight-week suspension from international cricket by the Emirates Cricket Board for violating the ‘Player’s Code of Conduct’ and requirements for the use of social media, a board release said. Rohan Mustafa, Ahmed Raza and Rameez Shahzad, participating in the Emerging Teams Cup in Pakistan earlier this month, had tweeted criticising the ground facilities in Karachi, after rain wiped out their hopes of a semi-final spot.

“Emirates Cricket Board (ECB) has today confirmed it has completed a disciplinary investigation relating to an alleged violation of its Player’s Code of Conduct, and use of Social Media following a recent incident during the Asian Cricket Council (ACC) Emerging Teams Asia Cup,” the ECB statement said.

“ECB concluded that 3 players; Rohan Mustafa, Ahmed Raza and Rameez Shahzad, had violated its Code of Conduct and requirements for the use of Social Media. As a result, each of the players have been suspended from International Cricket for a period of 8 weeks, fined and warned about their future conduct.”

UAE had restricted Hong Kong to 87 for 4 in 31 overs at the Southend Stadium in Karachi in the Group B match, before a spell of rain that lasted for about half an hour interrupted play. However, inadequate measures to cover the pitch and failed attempts to get the ground ready in time meant the match was abandoned, with the two teams sharing points. A win would have boosted UAE’s chances of a semi-final spot.

The players took to Twitter to express their frustration after the match, but the tweets were later deleted.

The board arrived upon the decision following a disciplinary investigation, and also handed out fines and warnings regarding their future conduct apart from the suspension.



Source link

Continue Reading

Cricket

High on Hope and IPL riches, West Indies eye series win

Published

on


Big Picture

Two days ago, West Indies crushed Bangladesh by eight wickets after chasing down their 130-run target in 10.5 overs. The next day, six of their players walked away with deals worth a total of USD 2.4 million (INR 17 crores) in the coveted IPL auction. It should put a smile on the face of the visitors who have had it rough in the last four weeks in Bangladesh.

And it is not just the IPL boys who will happy. Sheldon Cottrell, the left-arm quick, got career-best figures in Sylhet before Shai Hope struck six sixes in his 23-ball 55. Keemo Paul then struck three sixes in his unbeaten 14-ball 28 to take West Indies home. The Sylhet crowd, like Bangladesh’s bowlers and fielders, were stunned into silence.

The home side’s road to recovery will have to be through a more disciplined showing. The bowlers will be aided by the Dhaka pitch offering less bounce and pace.

Bangladesh’s batsmen must also use the pace on the ball from the West Indies fast bowlers. Neil McKenzie, the batting coach, said after the first game that there are better ways to go toe-to-toe with a pace attack. Tamim Iqbal, Soumya Sarkar, Liton Das and Shakib Al Hasan all got caught trying to pull the ball. Shakib, however, looked more comfortable, and that was because he was patient.

Bangladesh’s bowlers would hope that they get a larger total to defend and if they are bowling first, they must find ways to stop West Indies’ big hitters from getting away to a rampant start again.

Form guide

Bangladesh LWWLL (last five completed matches, most recent first)

West Indies WLLLL

In the spotlight

While batting, Shakib Al Hasan had great judgment of deliveries that were beyond his control, and then off the bad balls, he cashed in. His pragmatism during his 43-ball 61 should have been copied by many of his team-mates in the first game.

Sheldon Cottrell created an awkward angle with his pace and bounce to get 4 for 28. It will be a bit of a challenge to do so in Dhaka, so Cottrell may have to dip his hands into his bag of tricks to do something different.

Team news

Shakib Al Hasan has a bit of fever but he is unlikely to miss out. Bangladesh are likely to give their eight batsmen another opportunity but it might not be so for left-arm paceman Abu Hider. Rubel Hossain could replace him. Mohammad Mithun and Nazmul Islam are the other options in the squad.

Bangladesh (probable): 1 Tamim Iqbal, 2 Liton Das, 3 Soumya Sarkar, 4 Shakib Al Hasan (capt), 5 Mushfiqur Rahim (wk), 6 Mahmudullah, 7 Ariful Haque, 8 Mohammad Saifuddin 9 Mehidy Hasan, 10 Rubel Hossain, 11 Mustafizur Rahman

West Indies will be tempted to not change their XI after their overwhelming win in the first T20I. They also have Kesrick Williams, Khary Pierre, Denesh Ramdin and Sherfane Rutherford in reserve.

West Indies (probable): 1 Evin Lewis, 2 Shai Hope (wk), 3 Nicholas Pooran, 4 Darren Bravo, 5 Shimron Hetmyer, 6 Rovman Powell, 7 Carlos Brathwaite (capt), 8 Keemo Paul, 9 Fabian Allen, 10 Oshane Thomas, 11 Sheldon Cottrell

Pitch and conditions

Weather is likely to clear up by Thursday but dew will be a factor for both sides as it is a 5pm start in Dhaka. It might just end up being a high-scoring game because of the dew.

Stats and trivia

  • Mehidy Hasan has been struck for three sixes in an over twice this year, first against Sri Lanka in the January ODI tri-nation series final, and the second time against West Indies in the first T20I.

  • The Shere Bangla National Stadium has hosted 37 T20Is, the second-most behind Dubai International Cricket Stadium’s 47



Source link

Continue Reading

Cricket

PCB to pay nearly USD 2 million to BCCI after losing legal dispute

Published

on


Having suffered the injury of a lost claim for damages from the BCCI, the PCB now has to face up to the added insult of paying the India board nearly USD 2 million in legal costs.

Last month, the PCB’s attempt to claim USD 63 million from the BCCI for two bilateral series that did not take place in 2014 and 2015 was rejected by the ICC’s Dispute Resolution Committee (DRC).

As is the norm in arbitration cases such as this, the winning party claims legal costs from the losing side, which the BCCI had done. Those claims were submitted a week after the decision.

As with the final decision, there was a morsel of consolation for the PCB in that the panel decided they would not have to pay full costs.

“The Dispute Panel,” an ICC statement said, “has determined that the PCB should pay 60 percent of: “(a) the [BCCI’s] Claimed Costs; and (b) the administrative costs and expenses of the Panel… (including, without limitation, the fees of the Tribunal members, and the costs and expenses they incurred in relation to this matter), the figure whereof is to be supplied to the PCB by the ICC.”

Though neither party has made the total amount public, 60% is understood to come out to roughly USD 2 million. For a board that already does without playing India at bilateral cricket, or at home in Pakistan, that will be an especially unwelcome blow.

“The PCB notes the ICC Dispute Panel’s decision on BCCI’s claims for their legal expense incurred on the PCB-BCCI dispute,” the board said. “The award of significantly lesser costs than claimed by BCCI reflects that PCB’s case had merits. The PCB, however, reiterates its disappointment in the original decision/award given against it.”



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending