Connect with us

Cricket

Jason Roy avoids suspension after outburst against umpires

Published

on


Jason Roy has avoided suspension, and only been slapped with a 30% fine of his match fees, for his animated outburst aimed at umpire Kumara Dharmasena after being given out – incorrectly – in the World Cup semi-final against Australia at Edgbaston on Thursday.

Roy, leading England’s chase of Australia’s 223, was batting on 85 when he attempted to pull Pat Cummins’ short delivery and missed by a fair margin, as replays later confirmed. Alex Carey dived to his left behind the stumps and pulled off an excellent collection and went up in appeal along with the bowler and some of the Australian fielders. Umpire Dharmasena looked uncertain but raised his finger, and with Jonny Bairstow having wasted England’s review earlier in the innings, Roy had to go.

He stood his ground at first and then walked off clearly unhappy, remonstrating with the umpires – Marais Erasmus was the other on-field official – on his way out and making his displeasure obvious. The stump mics even caught a furious Roy yelling “that’s f***ing embarrassing”.

It seemed that he might draw the ire of the match officials for his show of dissent and cop a serious sanction, but was allowed to get away with the fine and two demerit points.

Demerit Points stay for a period of two years on a player’s disciplinary record from the date of enforcement. If Roy is handed two more demerit points, he will run the risk of a suspension point, two of which will then lead to a ban of one Test or two ODIs or two T20Is, whichever is scheduled first.

Roy’s performance with the bat – 85 off 65 balls with nine fours and five sixes – made a big difference to England’s cause as they crossed the line with eight wickets and 107 balls in hand, reaching their fourth World Cup final and first since 1992.

Roy is a key member of their plans, his blazing starts, which have so far added up to 426 runs in six innings, a big part of their success in recent years. So the fact that he has been let off with a rap on the knuckles and not handed a more severe punishment, perhaps even a one-match suspension, will make the England camp happy.



Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Cricket

‘Don’t know if we can be put under more pressure’ – Kagiso Rabada

Published

on


South Africa’s attack has seldom felt as much strain as they do on their current tour of India, despite the focus of their failures falling squarely on the batting. The top-order’s inability to bed in, the extra burden placed on the middle order and the lower-order rescue acts – that have only rubbed salt in the specialist batsmen’s wounds – have all been analysed in the aftermath of the defeats at Visakhapatnam and Pune. So some attention ahead of the final Test in Ranchi will turn to the bowlers, who acknowledge they have also found it difficult to find form.

“We’ve been put under immense pressure,” Kagiso Rabada said. “I don’t know if we can be put more pressure than that.”

India piled on totals in excess of 500 and 600 in the first innings of the two Tests, where South Africa were not only unable to control their scoring rate but also failed to bowl them out. In fact, South Africa last took 20 wickets in a Test match nine months and five Tests ago, when they beat Pakistan at home. Since then, South Africa have failed to bowl both Sri Lanka and India out twice each, albeit it in vastly different conditions.

At home against Sri Lanka, where South Africa generally rely on their quicks, they lacked the firepower to remove Sri Lanka’s tail. In India, where South Africa attempted to counter conditions with a more spin-heavy attack, their slower bowlers barely threatened and their fast men have also appeared ineffective, even when conditions have offered some assistance such as on the first morning in Pune.

ALSO READ: Markram, de Bruyn, Bavuma and SA at a crossroads

Rabada, who is South Africa’s leading seamer, only has four wickets from two matches, half that of Mohammed Shami and two fewer than Umesh Yadav. He believes the difference between the two packs has been the home team’s ability to generate some reverse-swing, while South Africa have not found any. “They got the ball to reverse and they bowled well as a collective,” Rabada said. “Their whole attack put pressure on us in every single aspect. Their spinners bowled well and when the ball was reversing their seamers could exploit that. We didn’t really get the ball to reverse and that’s a major weapon of ours.”

That’s not the only reason for South Africa’s lack of success. Often, they have bowled too wide and as Shami showed, attacking the stumps brings reward. More often, they have not found the right length, relying on short balls when pitching it up has proved more successful for India. Overall, South Africa lack the pace and penetration sides of the past have had on the subcontinent with no-one able to emulate Dale Steyn. There is also the issue of inexperience. Rabada, though tasked with being the frontman, is only 24 and it should be Vernon Philander who leads the attack but he has struggled on unhelpful surfaces. Anrich Nortje is on his first tour and Lungi Ngidi, who is in the squad, has not been passed fit enough to play a Test yet.

All that has put South Africa in a difficult position, from which few can see a way out. Rabada is taking the long view and hopes that this is merely a result of one era ending as another has yet to begin. “It’s never nice to lose, especially in the manner we’re losing right now but we’re going through a transition period,” he said. “Our team is fresh and young, so the best thing we can do is look at where we can improve and remember our strengths and build on them.”

The trouble is that for most of Rabada’s career South Africa have been in the same position. He made his Test debut in India by this time four years ago and then South Africa’s best period came in the 2017-18 home summer when they beat Zimbabwe, Bangladesh, India, and Australia at home. But their form has since been patchy as they search for consistency. Rabada hopes something can start in Ranchi, where South Africa will look to put in a better all-round display. “From a physical point of view we need to execute our skills and from a mental point of view, we need to believe we can do it in certain situations,” he said. It’s a balance we’re working on.”



Source link

Continue Reading

Cricket

Justin Langer told me I’m an idiot – Mitchell Marsh

Published

on


Mitchell Marsh received a succinct response from Australia coach Justin Langer after he suffered a broken right hand from punching the dressing room wall at the WACA on Sunday.

“He just told me I’m an idiot basically. He was disappointed for me,” Marsh said as he spoke to reporters with his right hand in a cast. “It certainly will be an isolated incident, that’s for sure, and it won’t be happening again.”

Marsh faces up to six weeks on the sidelines which is likely to rule him out of both Tests against Pakistan and he may just get one more Sheffield Shield match before it breaks for the BBL in mid-December.

“It’s pretty uncharacteristic of me to want to punch a wall. I’m a pretty easy-going sort of bloke,” he said. “I’m just disappointed really, gutted. The feeling of letting your team-mates down and not being able to be a part of the journey for the next four to six weeks, that was the point I wanted to stress to the lads, that I was really sorry and it’s not an example I wanted to be setting. They got around me. They still love me, so it’s all good.”

Marsh was an incumbent in the Test side following his recall for the final match of the Ashes although there was no guarantee that he would have been retained for the Pakistan series.

Australia’s second Test assignment of the season is a three-match series against New Zealand which begins in Perth on December 12.

Western Australia could now be without their captain for half of the Sheffield Shield campaign. Following the BBL, the competition resumes in mid-February for the final four rounds.



Source link

Continue Reading

Cricket

New South Wales forced to move match after SCG pitch suffers rugby damage

Published

on


New South Wales have been forced to move their first home Sheffield Shield match of the season against Tasmania away from the SCG amid concerns about the surface.

The wicket block was damaged when the Sydney Roosters rugby league team trained at the ground a fortnight ago ahead of the NRL Grand Final, and it has been decided the surface is not fit to host first-class cricket. The actual pitch designated for the Shield match would have been playable, but the rest of the square would not have been able to take the traffic of a four-day game.

The match will now likely be played at Drummoyne Oval with next week’s Marsh Cup match against Tasmania on October 23 also under threat of being moved.

ALSO READ: Everybody loses in Sydney’s turf wars

“We were unaware there was a problem until this morning,” Lee Germon, the NSW chief executive, said. “Our cricketers love playing at the SCG, which is the traditional home of NSW cricket. It is a great disappointment to our players and everyone at Cricket NSW that we can no longer play there over the next week.”

The increase in domestic fixtures at the SCG had been a significant win for New South Wales when the schedules were announced earlier this season, with four of their five home Sheffield Shield matches set for the Test venue.

“Our male players were looking forward to playing four of their five home Shield matches and a one-day match at the SCG this season, something that has rarely happened over the past decade or so,” Germon said. “Our off-season training and planning was based squarely around the fact that most of our matches would be at the SCG this season, creating an extra buzz of excitement.

“It is important that our current and future international cricketers have the opportunity to play as much cricket as possible on the SCG. This is particularly so early in the season when many of our senior players are available for the Sheffield Shield ahead of the international season.”

There was an increase in the amount of winter sport played at the SCG this year due to the demolition of the Allianz Stadium next door.

The SCG has resisted a move to the drop-in pitches which are seen at Adelaide, Melbourne and the new Perth Stadium.

The ground hosts its first international of the season on November 3 with a T20I against Pakistan.



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending